ESP32 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino IDE (Single, Multiple, Web Server) | Random Nerd Tutorials (2023)

This is a in-depth guide for the DS18B20 temperature sensor with ESP32 using Arduino IDE. We’ll show you how to wire the sensor, install the required libraries, and write the code to get the sensor readings from one and multiple sensors. Finally, we’ll build a simple web server to display the sensor readings.

ESP32 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino IDE (Single, Multiple, Web Server) | Random Nerd Tutorials (1)

You might also like reading other DS18B20 guides:

  • ESP8266 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino IDE
  • ESP32/ESP8266 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with MicroPython
  • ESP32 with Multiple DS18B20 Temperature Sensors
  • DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino

Introducing DS18B20 Temperature Sensor

The DS18B20 temperature sensor is a one-wire digital temperature sensor. This means that it just requires one data line (and GND) to communicate with your ESP32.

It can be powered by an external power supply or it can derive power from the data line (called “parasite mode”), which eliminates the need for an external power supply.

ESP32 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino IDE (Single, Multiple, Web Server) | Random Nerd Tutorials (2)

Each DS18B20 temperature sensor has a unique 64-bit serial code. This allows you to wire multiple sensors to the same data wire. So, you can get temperature from multiple sensors using just one GPIO.

The DS18B20 temperature sensor is also available in waterproof version.

ESP32 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino IDE (Single, Multiple, Web Server) | Random Nerd Tutorials (3)

Here’s a summary of the most relevant specs of the DS18B20 temperature sensor:

  • Communicates over one-wire bus communication
  • Power supply range: 3.0V to 5.5V
  • Operating temperature range: -55ºC to +125ºC
  • Accuracy +/-0.5 ºC (between the range -10ºC to 85ºC)

For more information consult the DS18B20 datasheet.

Parts Required

To follow this tutorial you need the following parts:

You can use the preceding links or go directly to MakerAdvisor.com/tools to find all the parts for your projects at the best price!

ESP32 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino IDE (Single, Multiple, Web Server) | Random Nerd Tutorials (4)

Schematic – ESP32

As mentioned previously, the DS18B20 temperature sensor can be powered through the VDD pin (normal mode), or it can derive its power from the data line (parasite mode). You can chose either modes.

If you’re using an ESP32 folllow one of these two schematic diagrams.

Parasite Mode

Normal Mode

(Video) ESP32 DHT11/DHT22 Asynchronous Web Server (auto updates Temperature and Humidity)

Preparing Your Arduino IDE

We’ll program the ESP32 using Arduino IDE, so make sure you have the ESP32 add-on installed before proceeding:

  • Install ESP32 Board in Arduino IDE (Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux instructions)

Installing Libraries

To interface with the DS18B20 temperature sensor, you need to install theOne Wire library by Paul Stoffregenand theDallas Temperature library. Follow the next steps to install those libraries.

1. Open your Arduino IDE and go toSketch>Include Library>Manage Libraries. The Library Manager should open.

2. Type “onewire” in the search box and install OneWire library by Paul Stoffregen.

3. Then, search for “Dallas” and install DallasTemperature library by Miles Burton.

ESP32 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino IDE (Single, Multiple, Web Server) | Random Nerd Tutorials (8)

After installing the libraries, restart your Arduino IDE.

Code (Single DS18B20)

After installing the required libraries, you can upload the code to the ESP32. The following code reads temperature from the DS18B20 temperature sensor and displays the readings on the Arduino IDE Serial Monitor.

/********* Rui Santos Complete project details at https://RandomNerdTutorials.com *********/#include <OneWire.h>#include <DallasTemperature.h>// GPIO where the DS18B20 is connected toconst int oneWireBus = 4; // Setup a oneWire instance to communicate with any OneWire devicesOneWire oneWire(oneWireBus);// Pass our oneWire reference to Dallas Temperature sensor DallasTemperature sensors(&oneWire);void setup() { // Start the Serial Monitor Serial.begin(115200); // Start the DS18B20 sensor sensors.begin();}void loop() { sensors.requestTemperatures(); float temperatureC = sensors.getTempCByIndex(0); float temperatureF = sensors.getTempFByIndex(0); Serial.print(temperatureC); Serial.println("ºC"); Serial.print(temperatureF); Serial.println("ºF"); delay(5000);}

View raw code

There are many different ways to get the temperature from DS18B20 temperature sensors. However, if you’re using just one single sensor, this is one of the easiest and simplest ways.

ESP32 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino IDE (Single, Multiple, Web Server) | Random Nerd Tutorials (9)

How the Code Works

Start by including the OneWire and the DallasTemperature libraries.

#include <OneWire.h>#include <DallasTemperature.h>

Create the instances needed for the temperature sensor. The temperature sensor is connected to GPIO 4.

// GPIO where the DS18B20 is connected toconst int oneWireBus = 4;// Setup a oneWire instance to communicate with any OneWire devicesOneWire oneWire(oneWireBus);// Pass our oneWire reference to Dallas Temperature sensor DallasTemperature sensors(&oneWire);

In the setup(), initialize the Serial Monitor at a baud rate of 115200.

Serial.begin(115200);

Initialize the DS18B20 temperature sensor:

sensors.begin();

Before actually getting the temperature, you need to call the requestTemperatures() method.

sensors.requestTemperatures(); 

Then, get the temperature in Celsius by using the getTempCByIndex() method as shown below:

(Video) Build an ESP32 Web Server with Arduino IDE

float temperatureC = sensors.getTempCByIndex(0);

Or use the getTempFByIndex() to get the temperature in Fahrenheit.

float temperatureF = sensors.getTempFByIndex(0);

The getTempCByIndex() and the getTempFByIndex() methods accept the index of the temperature sensor. Because we’re using just one sensor its index is 0. If you want to read more than one sensor, you use index 0 for one sensor, index 1 for other sensor and so on.

Finally, print the results in the Serial Monitor.

Serial.print(temperatureC);Serial.println("ºC");Serial.print(temperatureF);Serial.println("ºF");

New temperature readings are requested every 5 seconds.

delay(5000);

Demonstration

After uploading the code, you should get your sensor readings displayed in the Serial Monitor:

ESP32 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino IDE (Single, Multiple, Web Server) | Random Nerd Tutorials (10)

Getting Temperature from Multiple DS18B20 Temperature Sensors

ESP32 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino IDE (Single, Multiple, Web Server) | Random Nerd Tutorials (11)

The DS18B20 temperature sensor communicates using one-wire protocol and each sensor has a unique 64-bit serial code, so you can read the temperature from multiple sensors using just one single GPIO. You just need to wire all data lines together as shown in the following schematic diagram:

Code (Multiple DS18B20s)

Then, upload the following code. It scans for all devices on GPIO 4 and prints the temperature for each one. (This sketch is based on an example provided by the DallasTemperature library).

/********* Rui Santos Complete project details at https://RandomNerdTutorials.com *********/#include <OneWire.h>#include <DallasTemperature.h>// Data wire is plugged TO GPIO 4#define ONE_WIRE_BUS 4// Setup a oneWire instance to communicate with any OneWire devices (not just Maxim/Dallas temperature ICs)OneWire oneWire(ONE_WIRE_BUS);// Pass our oneWire reference to Dallas Temperature. DallasTemperature sensors(&oneWire);// Number of temperature devices foundint numberOfDevices;// We'll use this variable to store a found device addressDeviceAddress tempDeviceAddress; void setup(){ // start serial port Serial.begin(115200); // Start up the library sensors.begin(); // Grab a count of devices on the wire numberOfDevices = sensors.getDeviceCount(); // locate devices on the bus Serial.print("Locating devices..."); Serial.print("Found "); Serial.print(numberOfDevices, DEC); Serial.println(" devices."); // Loop through each device, print out address for(int i=0;i<numberOfDevices; i++){ // Search the wire for address if(sensors.getAddress(tempDeviceAddress, i)){ Serial.print("Found device "); Serial.print(i, DEC); Serial.print(" with address: "); printAddress(tempDeviceAddress); Serial.println(); } else { Serial.print("Found ghost device at "); Serial.print(i, DEC); Serial.print(" but could not detect address. Check power and cabling"); } }}void loop(){ sensors.requestTemperatures(); // Send the command to get temperatures // Loop through each device, print out temperature data for(int i=0;i<numberOfDevices; i++){ // Search the wire for address if(sensors.getAddress(tempDeviceAddress, i)){ // Output the device ID Serial.print("Temperature for device: "); Serial.println(i,DEC); // Print the data float tempC = sensors.getTempC(tempDeviceAddress); Serial.print("Temp C: "); Serial.print(tempC); Serial.print(" Temp F: "); Serial.println(DallasTemperature::toFahrenheit(tempC)); // Converts tempC to Fahrenheit } } delay(5000);}// function to print a device addressvoid printAddress(DeviceAddress deviceAddress) { for (uint8_t i = 0; i < 8; i++){ if (deviceAddress[i] < 16) Serial.print("0"); Serial.print(deviceAddress[i], HEX); }}

View raw code

Demonstration

In this example, we’re using three DS18B20 temperature sensors. This is what we get on the Arduino IDE Serial Monitor.

ESP32 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino IDE (Single, Multiple, Web Server) | Random Nerd Tutorials (13)

We have a dedicated article on how to interface multiple DS18B20 temperature sensors with the EPS32. Just follow the next tutorial:

  • ESP32 with Multiple DS18B20 Temperature Sensors

Display DS18B20 Temperature Readings in a Web Server

ESP32 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino IDE (Single, Multiple, Web Server) | Random Nerd Tutorials (15)

To build the web server we’ll use theESPAsyncWebServer library that provides an easy way to build an asynchronous web server. Building an asynchronous web server has several advantages. We recommend taking a quick look at the library documentation on its GitHub page.

Installing the ESPAsyncWebServer and AsyncTCP libraries

You need to install the following libraries in your Arduino IDE to build the web server for this project.

(Video) Episode 2: MicroPython on ESP32 - Interfacing OLED Display, DS18B20 Sensor & Creating Web Server

The ESPAsyncWebServer, AsynTCP, and ESPAsyncTCP libraries aren’t available to install through the Arduino Library Manager, so you need to copy the library files to the Arduino installation Libraries folder. Alternatively, in your Arduino IDE, you can go toSketch>Include Library>Add .zip Libraryand select the libraries you’ve just downloaded.

Code (DS18B20 Async Web Server)

Open your Arduino IDE and copy the following code.

/********* Rui Santos Complete project details at https://RandomNerdTutorials.com *********/// Import required libraries#ifdef ESP32 #include <WiFi.h> #include <ESPAsyncWebServer.h>#else #include <Arduino.h> #include <ESP8266WiFi.h> #include <Hash.h> #include <ESPAsyncTCP.h> #include <ESPAsyncWebServer.h>#endif#include <OneWire.h>#include <DallasTemperature.h>// Data wire is connected to GPIO 4#define ONE_WIRE_BUS 4// Setup a oneWire instance to communicate with any OneWire devicesOneWire oneWire(ONE_WIRE_BUS);// Pass our oneWire reference to Dallas Temperature sensor DallasTemperature sensors(&oneWire);// Variables to store temperature valuesString temperatureF = "";String temperatureC = "";// Timer variablesunsigned long lastTime = 0; unsigned long timerDelay = 30000;// Replace with your network credentialsconst char* ssid = "REPLACE_WITH_YOUR_SSID";const char* password = "REPLACE_WITH_YOUR_PASSWORD";// Create AsyncWebServer object on port 80AsyncWebServer server(80);String readDSTemperatureC() { // Call sensors.requestTemperatures() to issue a global temperature and Requests to all devices on the bus sensors.requestTemperatures(); float tempC = sensors.getTempCByIndex(0); if(tempC == -127.00) { Serial.println("Failed to read from DS18B20 sensor"); return "--"; } else { Serial.print("Temperature Celsius: "); Serial.println(tempC); } return String(tempC);}String readDSTemperatureF() { // Call sensors.requestTemperatures() to issue a global temperature and Requests to all devices on the bus sensors.requestTemperatures(); float tempF = sensors.getTempFByIndex(0); if(int(tempF) == -196){ Serial.println("Failed to read from DS18B20 sensor"); return "--"; } else { Serial.print("Temperature Fahrenheit: "); Serial.println(tempF); } return String(tempF);}const char index_html[] PROGMEM = R"rawliteral(<!DOCTYPE HTML><html><head> <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1"> <link rel="stylesheet" href="https://use.fontawesome.com/releases/v5.7.2/css/all.css" integrity="sha384-fnmOCqbTlWIlj8LyTjo7mOUStjsKC4pOpQbqyi7RrhN7udi9RwhKkMHpvLbHG9Sr" crossorigin="anonymous"> <style> html { font-family: Arial; display: inline-block; margin: 0px auto; text-align: center; } h2 { font-size: 3.0rem; } p { font-size: 3.0rem; } .units { font-size: 1.2rem; } .ds-labels{ font-size: 1.5rem; vertical-align:middle; padding-bottom: 15px; } </style></head><body> <h2>ESP DS18B20 Server</h2> <p> <i class="fas fa-thermometer-half" style="color:#059e8a;"></i> <span class="ds-labels">Temperature Celsius</span> <span id="temperaturec">%TEMPERATUREC%</span> <sup class="units">&deg;C</sup> </p> <p> <i class="fas fa-thermometer-half" style="color:#059e8a;"></i> <span class="ds-labels">Temperature Fahrenheit</span> <span id="temperaturef">%TEMPERATUREF%</span> <sup class="units">&deg;F</sup> </p></body><script>setInterval(function ( ) { var xhttp = new XMLHttpRequest(); xhttp.onreadystatechange = function() { if (this.readyState == 4 && this.status == 200) { document.getElementById("temperaturec").innerHTML = this.responseText; } }; xhttp.open("GET", "/temperaturec", true); xhttp.send();}, 10000) ;setInterval(function ( ) { var xhttp = new XMLHttpRequest(); xhttp.onreadystatechange = function() { if (this.readyState == 4 && this.status == 200) { document.getElementById("temperaturef").innerHTML = this.responseText; } }; xhttp.open("GET", "/temperaturef", true); xhttp.send();}, 10000) ;</script></html>)rawliteral";// Replaces placeholder with DS18B20 valuesString processor(const String& var){ //Serial.println(var); if(var == "TEMPERATUREC"){ return temperatureC; } else if(var == "TEMPERATUREF"){ return temperatureF; } return String();}void setup(){ // Serial port for debugging purposes Serial.begin(115200); Serial.println(); // Start up the DS18B20 library sensors.begin(); temperatureC = readDSTemperatureC(); temperatureF = readDSTemperatureF(); // Connect to Wi-Fi WiFi.begin(ssid, password); Serial.println("Connecting to WiFi"); while (WiFi.status() != WL_CONNECTED) { delay(500); Serial.print("."); } Serial.println(); // Print ESP Local IP Address Serial.println(WiFi.localIP()); // Route for root / web page server.on("/", HTTP_GET, [](AsyncWebServerRequest *request){ request->send_P(200, "text/html", index_html, processor); }); server.on("/temperaturec", HTTP_GET, [](AsyncWebServerRequest *request){ request->send_P(200, "text/plain", temperatureC.c_str()); }); server.on("/temperaturef", HTTP_GET, [](AsyncWebServerRequest *request){ request->send_P(200, "text/plain", temperatureF.c_str()); }); // Start server server.begin();} void loop(){ if ((millis() - lastTime) > timerDelay) { temperatureC = readDSTemperatureC(); temperatureF = readDSTemperatureF(); lastTime = millis(); } }

View raw code

Insert your network credentials in the following variables and the code will work straight away.

const char* ssid = "REPLACE_WITH_YOUR_SSID";const char* password = "REPLACE_WITH_YOUR_PASSWORD";

How the Code Works

In the following paragraphs we’ll explain how the code works. Keep reading if you want to learn more or jump to the “Demonstration” section to see the final result.

Importing libraries

First, import the required libraries for the ESP32 board:

#include <WiFi.h>#include <ESPAsyncWebServer.h>#include <OneWire.h>#include <DallasTemperature.h>

Instantiate DS18B20 Sensor

Define the GPIO that the DS18B20 data pin is connected to. In this case, it’s connected to GPIO 4.

#define ONE_WIRE_BUS 4

Instantiate the instances needed to initialize the sensor:

// Setup a oneWire instance to communicate with any OneWire devicesOneWire oneWire(ONE_WIRE_BUS);// Pass our oneWire reference to Dallas Temperature sensor DallasTemperature sensors(&oneWire);

Setting your network credentials

Insert your network credentials in the following variables, so that the ESP8266 can connect to your local network.

const char* ssid = "REPLACE_WITH_YOUR_SSID";const char* password = "REPLACE_WITH_YOUR_PASSWORD";

Create an AsyncWebServer object on port 80.

AsyncWebServer server(80);

Read Temperature Functions

Then, we create two functions to read the temperature.

The readDSTemperatureC() function returns the readings in Celsius degrees.

String readDSTemperatureC() { // Call sensors.requestTemperatures() to issue a global temperature and Requests to all devices on the bus sensors.requestTemperatures(); float tempC = sensors.getTempCByIndex(0); if(tempC == -127.00){ Serial.println("Failed to read from DS18B20 sensor"); return "--"; } else { Serial.print("Temperature Celsius: "); Serial.println(tempC); } return String(tempC);}

In case the sensor is not able to get a valid reading, it returns -127. So, we have an if statement that returns two dashes (–-) in case the sensor fails to get the readings.

if(tempC == -127.00){ Serial.println("Failed to read from DS18B20 sensor"); return "--";

The reaDSTemperatureF() function works in a similar way but returns the readings in Fahrenheit degrees.

The readings are returned as string type. To convert a float to a string, use the String() function.

return String(tempC);

Building the Web Page

The next step is building the web page. The HTML and CSS needed to build the web page are saved on the index_html variable.

In the HTML text we have TEMPERATUREC and TEMPERATUREF between % signs. This is a placeholder for the temperature values.

This means that this %TEMPERATUREC% text is like a variable that will be replaced by the actual temperature value from the sensor. The placeholders on the HTML text should go between % signs.

(Video) Measure Temperature and Humidity WiFi with ESP32 DHT11 and DHT22 - Robojax

We’ve explained in great detail how the HTML and CSS used in this web server works in a previous tutorial. So, if you want to learn more, refer to the next project:

  • DHT11/DHT22 Temperature and Humidity Web Server with Arduino IDE

Processor

Now, we need to create the processor() function, that will replace the placeholders in our HTML text with the actual temperature values.

String processor(const String& var){ //Serial.println(var); if(var == "TEMPERATUREC"){ return readDSTemperatureC(); } else if(var == "TEMPERATUREF"){ return readDSTemperatureF(); } return String();}

When the web page is requested, we check if the HTML has any placeholders. If it finds the %TEMPERATUREC% placeholder, we return the temperature in Celsius by calling the readDSTemperatureC() function created previously.

if(var == "TEMPERATUREC"){ return readDSTemperatureC();}

If the placeholder is %TEMPERATUREF%, we return the temperature in Fahrenheit.

else if(var == "TEMPERATUREF"){ return readDSTemperatureF();}

setup()

In the setup(), initialize the Serial Monitor for debugging purposes.

Serial.begin(115200);

Initialize the DS18B20 temperature sensor.

sensors.begin();

Connect to your local network and print the ESP32 IP address.

WiFi.begin(ssid, password);Serial.println("Connecting to WiFi");while (WiFi.status() != WL_CONNECTED) { delay(500); Serial.print(".");}Serial.println();// Print ESP8266 Local IP AddressSerial.println(WiFi.localIP());

Finally, add the next lines of code to handle the web server.

server.on("/", HTTP_GET, [](AsyncWebServerRequest *request){ request->send_P(200, "text/html", index_html, processor);});server.on("/temperaturec", HTTP_GET, [](AsyncWebServerRequest *request){ request->send_P(200, "text/plain", readDSTemperatureC().c_str());});server.on("/temperaturef", HTTP_GET, [](AsyncWebServerRequest *request){ request->send_P(200, "text/plain", readDSTemperatureF().c_str());});

When we make a request on the root URL, we send the HTML text that is stored in the index_html variable. We also need to pass the processor function, that will replace all the placeholders with the right values.

server.on("/", HTTP_GET, [](AsyncWebServerRequest *request){ request->send_P(200, "text/html", index_html, processor);});

We need to add two additional handlers to update the temperature readings. When we receive a request on the/temperaturecURL, we simply need to send the updated temperature value. It is plain text, and it should be sent as a char, so, we use the c_str() method.

server.on("/temperaturec", HTTP_GET, [](AsyncWebServerRequest *request){ request->send_P(200, "text/plain", readDSTemperatureC().c_str());});

The same process is repeated for the temperature in Fahrenheit.

server.on("/temperaturef", HTTP_GET, [](AsyncWebServerRequest *request){ request->send_P(200, "text/plain", readDSTemperatureF().c_str());});

Lastly, we can start the server.

server.begin();

Because this is an asynchronous web server, we don’t need to write anything in the loop().

void loop(){}

That’s pretty much how the code works.

Demonstration

After uploading the code, open the Arduino IDE Serial Monitor at a baud rate of 115200.Press the ESP32 on-board RST button and after a few seconds your IP address should show up.

In your local network, open a browser and typethe ESP32 IP address.

Now youcan seetemperature in Celsius and Fahrenheit in your web server. The sensor readings update automatically without the need to refresh the web page.

ESP32 DS18B20 Temperature Sensor with Arduino IDE (Single, Multiple, Web Server) | Random Nerd Tutorials (16)
(Video) ESP32: ESP-NOW Web Server Sensor Dashboard (ESP-NOW + Wi-Fi)

Wrapping Up

We hope you’ve found this tutorial useful. We have guides for other sensors and modules with the ESP32 that you may like:

  • ESP32 with BME280 (Pressure, Temperature and Humidity)
  • ESP32 Built-In Hall Effect Sensor
  • ESP32 OLED Display with Arduino IDE
  • ESP32 DHT Temperature and Humidity Sensor with Arduino IDE

If you want to learn more about the ESP32 take a look at our course, or check or ESP32 free resources:

  • Learn ESP32 with Arduino IDE
  • More ESP32 Projects and Tutorials

Thanks for reading.

FAQs

How do you use DS18B20 with ESP32? ›

Step 1 - Wiring

Connect ESP32 GND to the leftmost pin on the DS18B20 (or the black wire on waterproof sensor). Connect ESP32 D4 pin to the middle pin on the DS18B20 (or yellow wire on the waterproof sensor). Connect ESP32 3V3 pin to the rightmost pin on the DS18B20 (or red wire on the waterproof sensor).

How does DS18B20 temperature sensor work? ›

The sensor works by reading and converting the temperature and storing this value in scratchpad memory. The scratchpad memory is then read via the One-wire bus by the Dallas library. The power-on value in the scratchpad memory is 85 °C.

Does ESP32 have built in temperature sensor? ›

The ESP32-S2 has a built-in sensor used to measure the chip's internal temperature. The temperature sensor module contains an 8-bit Sigma-Delta ADC and a DAC to compensate for the temperature offset.

What is DS18B20 used for? ›

One-wire temperature sensors like the DS18B20 are devices that can measure temperature with a minimal amount of hardware and wiring. These sensors use a digital protocol to send accurate temperature readings directly to your development board without the need of an analog to digital converter or other extra hardware.

Which is better ESP32 vs ESP8266? ›

The ESP32 is much more powerful than the ESP8266, comes with more GPIOs with multiple functions, faster Wi-Fi, and supports Bluetooth. However, many people think that the ESP32 is more difficult to deal with than the ESP8266 because it is more complex.

What is the use of ESP32? ›

ESP32 can perform as a complete standalone system or as a slave device to a host MCU, reducing communication stack overhead on the main application processor. ESP32 can interface with other systems to provide Wi-Fi and Bluetooth functionality through its SPI / SDIO or I2C / UART interfaces.

What type of sensor is a DS18B20 temperature? ›

The core functionality of the DS18B20 is its direct-to- digital temperature sensor. The resolution of the tempera- ture sensor is user-configurable to 9, 10, 11, or 12 bits, corresponding to increments of 0.5°C, 0.25°C, 0.125°C, and 0.0625°C, respectively.

How accurate is DS18B20? ›

The DS18B20 has an accuracy of ±0.5°C Accuracy from -10°C to +85°C, but its still possible yours might be outside the error range depending were you got them from there of lots of rejects for sale on the web.

How much power does ESP32 use? ›

The chip consumes around 0.15 mA (if the ULP coprocessor is on) to 10µA.

How do you connect sensors to ESP32? ›

Wiring BME280 Sensor to ESP32

Connections are fairly simple. Start by connecting VIN pin to the 3.3V output on the ESP32 and connect GND to ground. Next, Connect the SCL pin to the I2C clock D22 pin on your ESP32 and connect the SDA pin to the I2C data D21 pin on your ESP32.

How does a DHT22 work? ›

The DHT22 is a basic, low-cost digital temperature and humidity sensor. It uses a capacitive humidity sensor and a thermistor to measure the surrounding air and spits out a digital signal on the data pin (no analog input pins needed). It's fairly simple to use but requires careful timing to grab data.

Is DS18B20 a digital sensor? ›

DS18B20 is 1-Wire digital temperature sensor from Maxim IC. Reports degrees in Celsius with 9 to 12-bit precision, from -55 to 125 (+/-0.5). Each sensor has a unique 64-Bit Serial number etched into it - allows for a huge number of sensors to be used on one data bus.

Is DS18B20 a thermocouple? ›

The DS18B20 is one type of temperature sensor and it supplies 9-bit to 12-bit readings of temperature. These values show the temperature of a particular device. The communication of this sensor can be done through a one-wire bus protocol which uses one data line to communicate with an inner microprocessor.

Why does DS18B20 need a resistor? ›

As a result, we need a pull-up resistor either to 'pull up' the power pin voltage near the voltage of the data line (when you want to avoid running a 'power' wire), or to pull up the data bus to logic 1 when it is idle if you decide to use a power wire, but don't want to use the internal pull-up resistor in the ...

Why are ESP32 so cheap? ›

The short answer is that it's cheap to manufacture. In particular the RF engineers have done a bunch of very clever things on the Wi-Fi side. You will also notice that in a lot of ways ESP32's design is not like other common microcontrollers. This is generally not by accident, it's to keep the overall cost down.

Is ESP32 better than Arduino? ›

Yes, the ESP32 is faster and more powerful than Arduino. The ESP32 is a powerful 32-bit microcontroller with integrated Wi-Fi, a full TCP/IP stack for internet connection, and Bluetooth 4.2. It has 10 internal capacitive touch sensors.

Is ESP32 same as Arduino? ›

The Big Differences

While there are several differences between Arduino and Esp32 boards, a few of the biggest are connectivity, clock rate, and price. In terms of connectivity, most Arduino boards don't have Wi-Fi or Bluetooth functionality on their own, and this includes the Arduino Zero.

Which is better ESP32 or Raspberry Pi? ›

The Pi Pico has 2 MB of Flash memory, while the ESP 32 has 4 MB. A board's flash memory is the location where the program is stored. ESP 32 has double the flash memory of Pico, but it also has wireless connectivity, so the 4 MB storage difference is negligible.

Is ESP32 a processor or controller? ›

ESP32 is a series of low-cost, low-power system on a chip microcontrollers with integrated Wi-Fi and dual-mode Bluetooth.

Does ESP32 have Wi-Fi? ›

The ESP32 has 2 WiFi modes: STATION ( WIFI_STA ) : The Station mode (STA) is used to connect the ESP32 module to a WiFi access point. The ESP32 behaves like a computer that is connected to our router. If the router is connected to the Internet, then the ESP32 can access the Internet.

How do I calibrate my DS18B20 sensor? ›

To calibrate a thermo-sensor, you have to measure something of which you know the temperature. The simple way to do it at home is using boiling water and a bath of melting ice, also called a "triple-point" bath. In those cases we know that water boils at 100°C on the sea level.

Is DS18B20 a thermistor? ›

It can act as a thermistor. We can use it in thermally sensitive projects. We can also use it in HVAC systems where temperature measuring is quite necessary.

How do you test a DS18B20 sensor? ›

Step 6: DS18B20 - Initial Testing
  1. Usable temperature range: -55 to 125°C (-67°F to +257°F)
  2. 9 to 12 bit selectable resolution.
  3. Uses 1-Wire interface - requires only one digital pin for communication.
  4. Unique 64 bit ID burned into chip.
  5. Multiple sensors can share one pin.
  6. ±0.5°C Accuracy from -10°C to +85°C.

How do you calibrate a temperature sensor? ›

There are three common methods for calibrating temperature sensors: Calibrating just the electronics with a simulator. Calibrating both the electronics and the sensor in a dry-well. Calibrating both the electronics and the sensor in a dry-well with a reference thermometer.

How does a waterproof temperature sensor work? ›

This sealed digital temperature probe lets you precisely measure temperatures in wet environments with a simple 1-Wire interface. The DS18B20 provides 9 to 12-bit (configurable) temperature readings over a 1-Wire interface, so that only one wire (and ground) needs to be connected from a central microprocessor.

How do you hook up a temperature sensor? ›

Step 1: How to Use a Temperature Sensor

Using the TMP36 is easy, simply connect the left pin to power (2.7-5.5V) and the right pin to ground. Then the middle pin will have an analog voltage that is directly proportional (linear) to the temperature. The analog voltage is independent of the power supply.

Which temperature sensor is used in Arduino Uno? ›

Introduction: Temperature Sensor With Arduino UNO

The LM35 series are precision integrated-circuit temperature devices with an output voltage linearly proportional to the Centigrade temperature.

Does Arduino have a temperature sensor? ›

The TMP36 is an analog temperature sensor. It outputs an analog value that is proportional to the ambient temperature. It is very similar to the LM35 temperature sensor.
...
5. TMP36.
TMP36
Power supply range2.7 V to 5.5 V
Temperature range-40°C to +125°C
Accuracy+/-1ºC (at 25ºC)
Interface with ArduinoanalogRead()
2 more rows

How does Arduino measure temperature? ›

Load the sketch to the Arduino and open your serial monitor, making sure the speed is 9600 baud. You should see some sensor parameter information followed by a continuous display of the temperature and humidity.

How do you connect sensors to ESP32? ›

Wiring BME280 Sensor to ESP32

Connections are fairly simple. Start by connecting VIN pin to the 3.3V output on the ESP32 and connect GND to ground. Next, Connect the SCL pin to the I2C clock D22 pin on your ESP32 and connect the SDA pin to the I2C data D21 pin on your ESP32.

What is the difference between DHT11 and DHT22 sensor? ›

The DHT22 is the more expensive version which obviously has better specifications. Its temperature measuring range is from -40 to +125 degrees Celsius with +-0.5 degrees accuracy, while the DHT11 temperature range is from 0 to 50 degrees Celsius with +-2 degrees accuracy.

What is thermostat sensor? ›

A thermostat is a contact type temperature sensor consisting of a bi-metallic strip made up of two dissimilar metals such as aluminium, copper, nickel, or tungsten. The difference in the coefficient of linear expansion of both the metals causes them to produce a mechanical bending movement when it's subjected to heat.

How much power does ESP32 use? ›

The chip consumes around 0.15 mA (if the ULP coprocessor is on) to 10µA.

Do Arduino sensors work with ESP32? ›

Even when it comes to the libraries, most of the Arduino libraries will just work with the ESP32, again because of the ESP32 Arduino core software that Espresif has developed.

Does ESP32 have analog pins? ›

The ESP32 integrates two 12-bit SAR (Successive Approximation Register) ADCs, supporting a total of 18 measurement channels (analog enabled pins).

What is the most accurate temperature sensor for Arduino? ›

DHT11 is perhaps the most popular, widely used, and reliable temperature and humidity sensor module for Arduino based projects. It can measure humidity from 20% to 90% RH and temperature from 0 to 50 degrees Celsius.

How many pins does temperature sensor have? ›

3. How many pins does temperature sensor have? Explanation: The temperature sensor LM35 have 3 legs, the first leg is Vcc, you can connect this to the 3.3V. The middle leg is Vout, where the temperature is read from.

Is DHT11 waterproof? ›

DHT22 is better then DHT11, but it isn't a waterproof sensor, check DS18B20 for waterproof temperature sensor.

What are the 2 types of temperature sensor? ›

There are four types of temperature sensors that are most commonly used in modern-day electronics: thermocouples, RTDs (resistance temperature detectors), thermistors, and semiconductor based integrated circuits (IC).

What is the difference between a thermostat and a temperature sensor? ›

A temperature sensor can help if you're consistently too cold or too warm in a room in your home. A thermostat only measures the temperature in the room that it's in. It heats or cools your entire home based on that temperature, even if it's different from the rooms where you spend the most time.

What is the range of temperature sensors? ›

Accuracy is low, from 0.5 °C to 5 °C but thermocouples operate across the widest temperature range, from -200 °C to 1750 °C.

Videos

1. How to set up ESP32 temperature sensor w/ Phyphox datalogging app using Bluetooth & Arduino IDE?
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2. ESP32/ESP8266 Plot Sensor Readings in Real Time Charts - Web Server
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3. ESP32 Email Alert Based on Temperature Threshold (change values on web server)
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4. ESP32 Publish Data to Cloud without Wi-Fi (TTGO T-Call ESP32 SIM800L)
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5. ESP8266 DHT11/DHT22 Temperature and Humidity Web Server with Arduino IDE - Demo
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6. Arduino DIY Car Temperature & Humidity Sensor - ESP8266 Module
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